joereorda:

AGNIESZKA BRZEZANSKA
BETTY PAGE/AQUARIUS, 2010
INKJET ON COTTON PAPER 
150 X 111 CM

joereorda:

AGNIESZKA BRZEZANSKA
BETTY PAGE/AQUARIUS, 2010
INKJET ON COTTON PAPER
150 X 111 CM

15 Anmerkungen 

“The bottom line is that saying there are differences in male and female brains is just not true. There is pretty compelling evidence that any differences are tiny and are the result of environment not biology,” said Prof Rippon.

“You can’t pick up a brain and say ‘that’s a girls brain, or that’s a boys brain’ in the same way you can with the skeleton. They look the same.”

Prof Rippon points to earlier studies that showed the brains of London black cab drivers physically changed after they had acquired The Knowledge – an encyclopaedic recall of the capital’s streets.
She believes differences in male and female brains are due to similar cultural stimuli. A women’s brain may therefore become ‘wired’ for multi-tasking simply because society expects that of her and so she uses that part of her brain more often. The brain adapts in the same way as a muscle gets larger with extra use.

“What often isn’t picked up on is how plastic and permeable the brain is. It is changing throughout out lifetime

“The world is full of stereotypical attitudes and unconscious bias. It is full of the drip, drip, drip of the gendered environment.”

Prof Rippon believes that gender differences appear early in western societies and are based on traditional stereotypes of how boys and girls should behave and which toys they should play with.

20.062 Anmerkungen 

fuckyeahsexpositivity:

bodysexgender:

The last one is gross tho.

Off topic, but I had no idea that vaginal lubricant contained squalene. I was taught about squalene in oceanography (it’s what helps sharks float in the absence of a swim bladder and is also possibly what prevents them from getting cancer), but not that it was produced by other animals than sharks. Cool!

—BB

(Quelle: iraffiruse)

217.155 Anmerkungen 

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Quick Queer History
Color Me Gender
Can You Name The Famous Child of American History Above?
Above sits Franklin D. Roosevelt. Yes, as in the 32nd President of United States of America. This picture of Roosevelt was snapped in 1884 when FDR was 2 ½ years old. During this time in American culture it was a common practice for young boys to wear dresses until they were 6 or 7 years old.
Wait, dresses?
Yes. Dresses were considered gender neutral clothing and colors were not directed towards males or females. Pastel colors started to be marketed more heavily for children in the mid-19th century without distinction towards any particular gender. It wasn’t until after World War I that businesses started marketing colors towards specific assigned genders.
During the turn of the 20th century, around the late 1910s, some companies started to market specific colors. At this time, blue was marketed to young girls and red to young boys. Historically, blue is attributed more often to women, such as in representations of the goddess or the Virgin Mary and pink was often attributed to men as a color of power and war.
With a pinch of irony, the raging Flapper movement introduced mainstream consumers to gender assigned clothing. By 1927, blue was being marketed to young boys and pink to young girls.
The practice is less than 90 years old. So next time your grandparents or parent comment on how you are dressed or the color scheme of your closet, you can simply reply that you are living like your grandparents/great-grandparents did when they were children – without boundries.          
And Now You  KNOWhomo|tumblr

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Quick Queer History

Color Me Gender

Can You Name The Famous Child of American History Above?

Above sits Franklin D. Roosevelt. Yes, as in the 32nd President of United States of America. This picture of Roosevelt was snapped in 1884 when FDR was 2 ½ years old. During this time in American culture it was a common practice for young boys to wear dresses until they were 6 or 7 years old.

Wait, dresses?

Yes. Dresses were considered gender neutral clothing and colors were not directed towards males or females. Pastel colors started to be marketed more heavily for children in the mid-19th century without distinction towards any particular gender. It wasn’t until after World War I that businesses started marketing colors towards specific assigned genders.

During the turn of the 20th century, around the late 1910s, some companies started to market specific colors. At this time, blue was marketed to young girls and red to young boys. Historically, blue is attributed more often to women, such as in representations of the goddess or the Virgin Mary and pink was often attributed to men as a color of power and war.

With a pinch of irony, the raging Flapper movement introduced mainstream consumers to gender assigned clothing. By 1927, blue was being marketed to young boys and pink to young girls.

The practice is less than 90 years old. So next time your grandparents or parent comment on how you are dressed or the color scheme of your closet, you can simply reply that you are living like your grandparents/great-grandparents did when they were children – without boundries.          

And Now You  KNOWhomo|tumblr

2.056 Anmerkungen 

vintagemarlene:

fearsome waffle cone aliens by christine mcconnell (www.twistedsifter.com)

vintagemarlene:

fearsome waffle cone aliens by christine mcconnell (www.twistedsifter.com)

49 Anmerkungen 

Das Leben muss nicht leicht sein, wenn es nur inhaltsreich ist.
Lise Meitner

2damnfeisty:

materiajunkie:

"Curing AIDS? Shit, that’s like Cadillac making a car that lasts for 50 years. And you know they can do it, but they ain’t going to do nothing that fucking dumb. Shit, they got metal on the Space Shuttle that can go around the Moon and withstand  temperatures of up to 20,000 degrees, you mean to tell me you don’t think they can make an El Dorado with a fuckin’ bumper that don’t fall off?"

- Chris Rock (“Bigger and Blacker”, 1999)

image

#staywoke

170.567 Anmerkungen 

I have trouble leaving places.”

Frances Ha (2012) Dir. Noah Baumbach

67 Anmerkungen